The South Asia Inscriptions Database

Ramtek Memorial Stone

The inscription is on two rectangular blocks of stone built one below the other into the right wall inside the maṇḍapa of the Kevala Narasiṃha temple of Rāmṭek. It is not clear from reports whether these are architectonic blocks or slabs fixed to the wall. The lower block is broken vertically across the middle. The stones are here treated as a single object since they have a shared history and no individual data are reported about them.

Object URI
OB00182
Extent
104cm width x 56cm height.
Notes and provenance
The Nachnā-kī-talāi stone inscription was located in 1883-84 by Alexander Cunningham. The inscription is inscribed on two sides of a loose slab which was found on the ground outside the fort of Kuṭhārā. (Shastri, p. 55). The inscription is identical to the one found at Ganj. The inscription records the meritorious action of Vyāghradeva who is described in the inscription as meditating upon the feet of Pṛthivīṣeṇa. (Shastri, p. 55) It has not been definitively proven whether the inscriptions refer to Pṛthivīṣeṇa I or Pṛthivīṣeṇa II. It is assumed that Vyāghradeva was a feudatory or officer under the Pṛthivīṣeṇa mentioned in the inscription.

Memorial stone inscription discovered during cleaning undertaken by the Directorate of Archaeology and Museums, Maharashtra Government in the early 1980s. The inscription is carved onto stones fixed on the inside wall of the mandapa of the Kevala-Narasimha temple at Ramtek. The inscription records a pious action of an unidentified daughter of Prabhāvatī Guptā, during the reign of her brother Pravarasena II. (Bakker, Hans & Isaacson, Harunaga, ‘The Ramtek Inscriptions II: The Vākāṭaka inscriptions in the Kevala-Narasimha Temple’ Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, Vol. 56, no. 1, 1993, pp. 46-74) However the inscription is damaged and a clear reading of the inscription is not possible at this point in time. (Shastri, p. 125-126).
History details
The inscription was uncovered around 1980 during conversation work on the Kevala Narasiṃha temple in Rāmṭek (21.396175,79.333893). Previously it had been hidden beneath layers of whitewash and lime plaster.
Event Type
Stored
Place
in situ
Event Place Uncertain