The South Asia Inscriptions Database

Deotek Inscription of Rudrasena

Object Reference
Object URI
OB00142
Inscription URI
IN00155

Basic Metadata

Decoration
None.
Language
Sanskrit
Script
southern box-headed
Script size
4.5-19
Date (min)
300
Date (max)
399
Date comments
Basis of dating: palaeography, conjecture.
Toggle Width
Toggle Edition Styling
Diplomatic Edition
Edition
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<?xml-model href="http://www.stoa.org/epidoc/schema/latest/tei-epidoc.rng" schematypens="http://relaxng.org/ns/structure/1.0"?>
<?xml-model href="http://www.stoa.org/epidoc/schema/latest/tei-epidoc.rng" schematypens="http://purl.oclc.org/dsdl/schematron"?>
<TEI xmlns="http://www.tei-c.org/ns/1.0" xml:lang="eng-Latn" xml:space="preserve">
<teiHeader>
<fileDesc>
<titleStmt>
<title>Deotek Inscription of Rudrasena</title>
<editor>Dániel Balogh</editor>
</titleStmt>
<publicationStmt>
<authority>Siddham - The South Asia Inscriptions Database</authority>
<idno type="siddham_inscription_identifier">IN00155</idno>
</publicationStmt>
<sourceDesc>
<msDesc>
<msIdentifier>
<msName>Deotek Stone Slab</msName>
<idno type="siddham_object_identifier">OB00142</idno>
<repository>Central Museum, Nagpur</repository>
</msIdentifier>
<physDesc>
<objectDesc>
<supportDesc>
<support>
<material>stone / sandstone</material>
<objectType>slab</objectType>
<extent>
<dimensions unit="cm">
<width>275</width>
<height />
<depth>86-106</depth>
</dimensions>
<measure type="weight" unit="gram">not available</measure>
</extent>
<p>The slab is wider at one end and and narrower at the other (an oblong trapezoid). Its height/thickness is not reported. It bears a Mauryan-period inscription written lengthwise about the middle region of the top of the slab, and a Vākāṭaka inscription (%IN00155) running crosswise, beginning at the narrower end of the stone. Sometime in the course of its history it was converted into a liṅga base; the socket for the liṅga is next to the Vākāṭaka inscription (i.e. below its last line, if I understand correctly, but Mirashi's description is none too clear), and a roughly cut channel was "carried mercilessly" (#ASIR_07:124 ) through this inscription to drain off oblations.</p>
</support>
</supportDesc>
<layoutDesc>
<layout>
<dimensions unit="cm">
<width />
<height />
</dimensions>
<p>Five lines, badly damaged in many places and destroyed by a channel cut across the middle of the inscription. Campus size not reported; the width may be about 85 cm if the lines extend throughout the width (depth) of th slab.</p>
</layout>
</layoutDesc>
</objectDesc>
<handDesc>
<height unit="cm">4.5-19</height>
<p>southern box-headed</p>
</handDesc>
<decoDesc>
<p>None.</p>
</decoDesc>
</physDesc>
<history>
<origin>
<origPlace />
<origDate />
</origin>
<p>First inscribed in Mauryan times. #ASIR_07:124 felt that the Vākāṭaka inscription was "cut evidently with some regard for the prior inscription", but #Mirashi:1963:1-2 disagrees, believing that part of the earlier inscription had been chiselled away to make room for the later one. At a yet later stage the slab was converted into a liṅga base. The stone was discovered by J.D. Beglar in 1873-74 in the village of Deoṭek (20.60981, 79.738403), 50 miles southeast of Nagpur. At the time it was in the shade of a magnificent tamarind tree in what had been the sanctum of a wholly ruined small temple, and was a favourite resting spot with locals. A photograph of the site (with a less ruined temple) is available at http://www.bl.uk/onlinegallery/onlineex/apac/photocoll/g/largeimage59252.html. #ASIR_07:125 notes that this type of stone is not found in the vicinity of its findspot, so the stone may have originated elsewhere.</p>
</history>
</msDesc>
</sourceDesc>
</fileDesc></teiHeader>
<text>
<body>
<div type="edition" xml:lang="san-Latn"><p>
<lb n="1" />cikka<unclear>mburi</unclear> <gap quantity="1" reason="lost" unit="character" /> <unclear>sa</unclear> #<unclear>r</unclear><unclear cert="low">i</unclear> <gap precision="low" quantity="2" reason="illegible" unit="character" />
<lb n="2" /><gap precision="low" quantity="1" reason="illegible" unit="character" /> <unclear>sa</unclear>ja<unclear cert="low">tra</unclear> <gap quantity="1" reason="lost" unit="character" /> <gap precision="low" quantity="4" reason="illegible" unit="character" />
<lb n="3" /><unclear>prava</unclear>rama <gap quantity="1" reason="lost" unit="character" /> <gap precision="low" quantity="2" reason="illegible" unit="character" /> <choice><unclear>ma</unclear><unclear>ba</unclear></choice><choice><unclear>s</unclear><unclear>n</unclear></choice>yāya<unclear>ṃ</unclear>
<lb n="4" /><gap precision="low" quantity="1" reason="illegible" unit="character" /> va<unclear>ṃ</unclear>śa-<supplied reason="lost">jā</supplied>tasyedaṃ rudra
<lb break="no" n="5" />sena-rā<unclear cert="low">jña</unclear><supplied reason="lost">ḥ</supplied> <supplied reason="undefined">sva</supplied>-dharmma-sthāna<unclear>ṃ</unclear><supplied reason="omitted">|</supplied>
</p>

</div></body>
</text>
</TEI>
Bibliographic Information (view/hide)
Bibliography description
First reported in #ASIR_07:124-125. Edited (with rubbing) in #Mirashi_1937a (re-published as #Mirashi_1960:109-117). Also described in #Cunningham_1877:28-29, with transcription (p. 102) and eye copy (plate 15). Re-examined by Mirashi for the All-India Oriental Conference in 1935, edition published as #Mirashi_1937. Discussed in #Shastri_1997:3-5.
Inscription Concordance
Concordance Item
Concordance Item Number
1
Images (view/hide)
XML Plain
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<?xml-model href="http://www.stoa.org/epidoc/schema/latest/tei-epidoc.rng" schematypens="http://relaxng.org/ns/structure/1.0"?>
<?xml-model href="http://www.stoa.org/epidoc/schema/latest/tei-epidoc.rng" schematypens="http://purl.oclc.org/dsdl/schematron"?>
<TEI xmlns="http://www.tei-c.org/ns/1.0" xml:lang="eng-Latn" xml:space="preserve">
<teiHeader>
<fileDesc>
<titleStmt>
<title>Deotek Inscription of Rudrasena</title>
<editor>Dániel Balogh</editor>
</titleStmt>
<publicationStmt>
<authority>Siddham - The South Asia Inscriptions Database</authority>
<idno type="siddham_inscription_identifier">IN00155</idno>
</publicationStmt>
<sourceDesc>
<msDesc>
<msIdentifier>
<msName>Deotek Stone Slab</msName>
<idno type="siddham_object_identifier">OB00142</idno>
<repository>Central Museum, Nagpur</repository>
</msIdentifier>
<physDesc>
<objectDesc>
<supportDesc>
<support>
<material>stone / sandstone</material>
<objectType>slab</objectType>
<extent>
<dimensions unit="cm">
<width>275</width>
<height />
<depth>86-106</depth>
</dimensions>
<measure type="weight" unit="gram">not available</measure>
</extent>
<p>The slab is wider at one end and and narrower at the other (an oblong trapezoid). Its height/thickness is not reported. It bears a Mauryan-period inscription written lengthwise about the middle region of the top of the slab, and a Vākāṭaka inscription (%IN00155) running crosswise, beginning at the narrower end of the stone. Sometime in the course of its history it was converted into a liṅga base; the socket for the liṅga is next to the Vākāṭaka inscription (i.e. below its last line, if I understand correctly, but Mirashi's description is none too clear), and a roughly cut channel was "carried mercilessly" (#ASIR_07:124 ) through this inscription to drain off oblations.</p>
</support>
</supportDesc>
<layoutDesc>
<layout>
<dimensions unit="cm">
<width />
<height />
</dimensions>
<p>Five lines, badly damaged in many places and destroyed by a channel cut across the middle of the inscription. Campus size not reported; the width may be about 85 cm if the lines extend throughout the width (depth) of th slab.</p>
</layout>
</layoutDesc>
</objectDesc>
<handDesc>
<height unit="cm">4.5-19</height>
<p>southern box-headed</p>
</handDesc>
<decoDesc>
<p>None.</p>
</decoDesc>
</physDesc>
<history>
<origin>
<origPlace />
<origDate />
</origin>
<p>First inscribed in Mauryan times. #ASIR_07:124 felt that the Vākāṭaka inscription was "cut evidently with some regard for the prior inscription", but #Mirashi:1963:1-2 disagrees, believing that part of the earlier inscription had been chiselled away to make room for the later one. At a yet later stage the slab was converted into a liṅga base. The stone was discovered by J.D. Beglar in 1873-74 in the village of Deoṭek (20.60981, 79.738403), 50 miles southeast of Nagpur. At the time it was in the shade of a magnificent tamarind tree in what had been the sanctum of a wholly ruined small temple, and was a favourite resting spot with locals. A photograph of the site (with a less ruined temple) is available at http://www.bl.uk/onlinegallery/onlineex/apac/photocoll/g/largeimage59252.html. #ASIR_07:125 notes that this type of stone is not found in the vicinity of its findspot, so the stone may have originated elsewhere.</p>
</history>
</msDesc>
</sourceDesc>
</fileDesc></teiHeader>
<text>
<body>
<div type="edition" xml:lang="san-Latn"><p>
<lb n="1" />cikka<unclear>mburi</unclear> <gap quantity="1" reason="lost" unit="character" /> <unclear>sa</unclear> #<unclear>r</unclear><unclear cert="low">i</unclear> <gap precision="low" quantity="2" reason="illegible" unit="character" />
<lb n="2" /><gap precision="low" quantity="1" reason="illegible" unit="character" /> <unclear>sa</unclear>ja<unclear cert="low">tra</unclear> <gap quantity="1" reason="lost" unit="character" /> <gap precision="low" quantity="4" reason="illegible" unit="character" />
<lb n="3" /><unclear>prava</unclear>rama <gap quantity="1" reason="lost" unit="character" /> <gap precision="low" quantity="2" reason="illegible" unit="character" /> <choice><unclear>ma</unclear><unclear>ba</unclear></choice><choice><unclear>s</unclear><unclear>n</unclear></choice>yāya<unclear>ṃ</unclear>
<lb n="4" /><gap precision="low" quantity="1" reason="illegible" unit="character" /> va<unclear>ṃ</unclear>śa-<supplied reason="lost">jā</supplied>tasyedaṃ rudra
<lb break="no" n="5" />sena-rā<unclear cert="low">jña</unclear><supplied reason="lost">ḥ</supplied> <supplied reason="undefined">sva</supplied>-dharmma-sthāna<unclear>ṃ</unclear><supplied reason="omitted">|</supplied>
</p>

</div></body>
</text>
</TEI>